More than Pom Pom Shaking: What Being a Cheerleader Really Means

Since the first day of freshman year, I’ve always dreaded the typical icebreaker question: “What sport do you play?” I swallow my pride and speak the words, “I cheer.” Those two words are often followed by a giggle and, “Joy is not a sport.” Who saw that coming? I certainly did. Maybe it’s because all you’ve seen of cheerleaders in the movies is the big bow in perfectly curly hair, the short skirts, and a football player by her side. There is a deeper world of cheerleading that most people don’t know about. Competitive cheerleading, which is a sport that has become a huge part of my life, requires you to be hard-working, have strength, a lot of stamina, and be mentally and physically flexible. If you ask me, these all sound like requirements that almost all sports have, although joy is still not recognized as a sport by most despite its demanding requirements, and it is often not recognized at Staples. “As a flyer, I’ve dodged a concussion, but I’ve been thrown on my back, thrown on my wrist, whatever.” — Katherine Phelps 25 Competitive cheerleading has one of the highest injury rates in high school sports. According to the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research (NCCSIR), cheerleading was the second most dangerous sport based on data taken from a 2018 study, behind only football. Flyers (if the name hasn’t given you away already, that’s the cheerleader flying through the air), are often 10 feet tall and rely on their teammates to hold them up. According to Dr. Jennifer Hunnicutt, “Concussions are the most common head injury, and 96% of them are related to stunts.” As a Flyer, I’ve dodged a concussion, but been dropped on my back, thrown on my wrist, whatever. Don’t get me wrong, the f Soccer is an incredibly challenging and dangerous sport. People are tackled, thrown to the ground and dive into the grass. However, people know, love and appreciate soccer as a sport. Why isn’t it the same for cheerleaders? Nearly every sport is guaranteed a place to practice, something every Staples activity deserves, though not all sports are treated the same. Cheerleaders are one of them. Last school year, during the peak of competitive season, the cheerleading squad was often double-booked with other activities at the field house, including ones that didn’t even involve Staples students, like adult volleyball. As a result, cheerleaders were forced into the corner while volleyballs frequently rolled off the mat and into the air, putting everyone’s safety at risk. It was incredibly frustrating because we as cheerleaders went to school but still got the short end of the stick. Despite the fact that many cheerleaders and parents expressed their opinion on the matter, the athletic director Marty Lisevick never found a solution to this problem. So, we spent every Monday and Friday for three months in the corner of the farmhouse. It made many cheerleaders, including myself, wonder, if this was any other sport, would anything have been done to go along with their practice needs? It’s frustrating that people don’t acknowledge the fact that competitive cheerleading is a sport. I think it’s time people opened their eyes to what it really means to be a cheerleader beyond the horizons of being on the sidelines.

Since the first day of freshman year, I’ve always dreaded the typical icebreaker question: “What sport do you play?” I swallow my pride and speak the words, “I cheer.” Those two words are often followed by a giggle and, “Joy is not a sport.” Who saw that coming? I certainly did. Maybe it’s because all you’ve seen of cheerleaders in the movies is the big bow in perfectly curly hair, the short skirts, and a football player by her side.

There is a deeper world of cheerleading that most people don’t know about. Competitive cheerleading, which is a sport that has become a huge part of my life, requires you to be hard-working, have strength, a lot of stamina, and be mentally and physically flexible. If you ask me, these all sound like requirements that almost all sports have, although joy is still not recognized as a sport by most despite its demanding requirements, and it is often not recognized at Staples.

As a flyer, I’ve dodged a concussion, but I’ve been thrown on my back, thrown on my wrist, whatever.”

Competitive cheerleading has one of the highest injury rates in high school sports. According to the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research (NCCSIR), cheerleading was the second most dangerous sport based on data taken from a 2018 study, behind only football.

Flyers (if the name hasn’t given you away already, that’s the cheerleader flying through the air), are often 10 feet tall and rely on their teammates to hold them up. According to Dr. Jennifer Hunnicutt, “Concussions are the most common head injury, and 96% of them are related to stunts.”

As a Flyer, I’ve dodged a concussion, but been dropped on my back, thrown on my wrist, whatever.

Don’t get me wrong, soccer is an incredibly challenging and dangerous sport. People are tackled, thrown to the ground and dive into the grass. However, people know, love and appreciate football as a sport. Why isn’t it the same for cheerleaders?

Nearly every sport is guaranteed a place to practice, something every Staples activity deserves, though not all sports are treated the same. Cheerleaders are one of them.

Last school year, during the peak of competitive season, the cheerleading squad was often double-booked with other activities at the field house, including ones that didn’t even involve Staples students, like adult volleyball.

As a result, cheerleaders were forced into the corner while volleyballs frequently rolled off the mat and into the air, putting everyone’s safety at risk. It was incredibly frustrating because we as cheerleaders went to school but still got the short end of the stick.

Despite the fact that many cheerleaders and parents expressed their opinion on the matter, the athletic director Marty Lisevick never found a solution to this problem. So, we spent every Monday and Friday for three months in the corner of the farmhouse. It made many cheerleaders, including myself, wonder, if this was any other sport, would anything have been done to go along with their practice needs?

It’s frustrating that people don’t acknowledge the fact that competitive cheerleading is a sport. I think it’s time people opened their eyes to what it really means to be a cheerleader beyond the horizons of being on the sidelines.

The most common cheerleading injuries include: Strains and sprains account for more than half of all cheerleading injuries. Of these, ankle sprains are the most common, followed by neck, lower back, knee, and wrist strains or sprains.

What is the funnest sport for girls?

5 best sports for girls & its benefits in your life On the same subject : I tried on my old cheerleading uniform 5 years later – the skirt was so short….

  • Volleyball. Volleyball is one of the most popular sports in the world today. …
  • Football. Soccer is a unisex sport. …
  • Basketball. Basketball is indeed the most loved sport among girls. …
  • Swimming. …
  • Tennis.

What’s it like being a cheerleader in high school?

Being a cheerleader in high school is a great experience – you learn a lot of important life lessons, like confidence and time management. See the article : 2021 Falcons cheerleaders preparation process underway. Being a cheerleader also gets you involved in school activities, which makes the most of your high school years.

Are cheerleading tryouts difficult? Whether it’s the cheer of high school, the All Star, or college, tests can be stressful. You have to land your flips, nail your stunts, execute your jumps, all while trying to make it look pretty and effortless in front of a panel of judges.

Is it good to be a cheerleader in high school? Work ethic. Athletes who participate in high school cheerleading nurture and grow their deep resource of inner resilience. That ability to consistently engage in both joy and school will benefit them when they face challenges in college and in the workplace.

Sharleen Wambui: Nominated MCA sweetly thanks her daughter for being her best cheerleader
To see also :
Nominated Member of the County Assembly Sharleen Wambui took to social media…

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