Order points: Ardern dons 2000s cheerleader chic, while Luxon dons Black Ferns gear.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern sits down to dinner with the Black Ferns on Thursday night.

Stuff’s political reporters share distractions and bee-life observations in Points of Order, their weekly column on the quirks of Parliament. OPINION: Labor MPs spent last weekend with their super-fans, talking shop and seeking barista-made coffee at the Labor Party’s annual conference in Manukau. Party conferences offer politicians the opportunity to highlight policies in front of adoring crowds. For Labour, that was its childcare announcement. Mainly, though, conferences are gatherings for all the people who dress up in political gear and hand out leaflets at election time. And so Labor leaders gave potential election slogans a test run over the weekend. Leader Jacinda Ardern said, “Bring it on!” Perhaps a nod to the 2000s classic cheerleading movie series. It earned a standing ovation on stage, and more applause minutes later from supporters gathered behind reporters at a press stand. Ardern said they had not decided what their slogan would be before thanking the “live audience” watching the stand.David White/StuffJacinda Ardern and Grant Robertson at the end of her keynote speech at the Labor Party Conference in Manukau. Deputy Prime Minister Grant Robertson chimed in, “We’ve got this.” If that makes the cut, “remember it was me who made it,” he said. Deputy leader Kelvin Davis had a more serious catchphrase, “Do what’s right”. Back in Wellington, it’s been a bad start to the week for Health Minister Andrew Little. He was told by Speaker Adrian Rurawhe about an “unparliamentary remark” in a written reply to National Health spokesman Shane Reti. As punishment, Reti had to ask Little an extra five supplementary questions in question time. What started the storytelling? Little responded to a question about how he monitored the flu season by saying, “I have no comment on the member’s conspiracy theories.” Reti told Stuff he was sick of the “repeated misu zo of Little’s written rliamentary questions”. Tom Lee/StuffHealth Minister Andrew Little dropped by Waikato University to announce funding for campus mental health initiatives. On the subject of Little answering questions, the minister was asked about Labor hopeful Georgie Dansey, who is contesting the Hamilton West by-election, and the claim her appearance at a Waikato University protest the day after she was elected was a “communications mix-up. -up”. Spotted by Stuff last week, Dansey was among the protesters calling for more action on pay issues.Extracting a short answer from politicians is usually a difficult task, but on this Little was incredibly brief in his answers, giving a simple, “yes” when asked, did he maintain it was confusion The cheering continued for Ardern later in the week She and Nationals leader Christopher Luxon showed their sporting prowess as the Black Ferns enter tonight’s highly anticipated Rugby World Cup final, the latest to pick up the ball and Pass it.StuffHere’s some inspiration to get the ball rolling… including some moves from real rugby stars. Go the Black F hedgehogs! Pass It On! Luxon donned his Black Ferns strip and went for a dynamic toss outside Parliament, while Ardern used a toy Zespri kiwifruit, a replica of the mascot featured in Japanese TV commercials and known as the swaying kiwifruit during last year’s trade mission to Japan. Fortunately, Ardern had a spare after losing an eye following an incident with an employee. Andrew Cornaga / www.photosport.Ruby Tui celebrating her try during the New Zealand v France semi-final match at Eden Park. During dinner with a number of Black Ferns athletes, including Stacey Fluhler, Portia Woodman and Ayesha Leti-I’iga in Auckland, Ardern received a cheeky question from rugby star Ruby Tui. Tui posted on social media asking Ardern, “Aunt Cindy, I’m just wondering who am you going to end up being prime minister can you give me Ardern [a turn]?” Ardern laughed and n odd.

Stuff’s political reporters share distractions and bee-life observations in Points of Order, their weekly column on the quirks of Parliament.

OPINION: Labor MPs spent last weekend with their super-fans, talking shop and seeking barista-made coffee at the Labor Party’s annual conference in Manukau.

Party conferences offer politicians the opportunity to highlight policies in front of adoring crowds. For Labour, that was its childcare announcement. Mainly, though, conferences are gatherings for all the people who dress up in political gear and hand out leaflets at election time. And so Labor leaders gave potential election slogans a test run over the weekend.

Leader Jacinda Ardern said, “Bring it on!” Perhaps a nod to the 2000s classic cheerleading movie series.

It earned a standing ovation on stage, and more applause minutes later from supporters gathered behind reporters at a press stand. Ardern said they had not decided what their slogan would be, before thanking the “live audience” watching the stand-up.

Jacinda Ardern and Grant Robertson at the end of her keynote speech at the Labor Party Conference in Manukau.

Deputy Prime Minister Grant Robertson chimed in, “We’ve got this.” If that makes the cut, “remember it was me who made it,” he said. Deputy leader Kelvin Davis had a more serious catchphrase, “Do what’s right”.

Back in Wellington, it’s been a bad start to the week for Health Minister Andrew Little. He was told by Speaker Adrian Rurawhe about an “unparliamentary remark” in a written reply to National Health spokesman Shane Reti.

As punishment, Reti had to ask Little an extra five supplementary questions in question time. What started the storytelling? Little responded to a question about how he monitored the flu season by saying, “I have no comment on the member’s conspiracy theories.”

Reti told Stuff he was sick of Little’s “repeated misuse of scripted parliamentary questions”.

Health Minister Andrew Little dropped by Waikato University to announce funding for campus mental health initiatives.

On the subject of Little answering questions, the minister was asked about Labor hopeful Georgie Dansey, who is contesting the Hamilton West by-election, and the claim her appearance at a Waikato University protest the day after she was elected was a “communications mix-up. -up”. Spotted by Stuff last week, Dansey was among the protesters demanding more action on pay issues.

Extracting a short answer from politicians is usually a difficult task, but on this Little was incredibly short in his answers, giving a simple, “yes” when asked if he supported that it was confusion.

The cheering continued for Ardern later in the week.

She and National leader Christopher Luxon have shown their athletic prowess as the Black Ferns enter tonight’s highly-anticipated Rugby World Cup final, the latest to take the ball and Cross It.

Here’s some inspiration to get the ball rolling… including some moves from genuine rugby stars. Go the Black Ferns! Pass It On!

Luxon donned his Black Ferns strip and went for a dynamic toss outside Parliament, while Ardern used a toy Zespri kiwifruit, a replica of the mascot featured in Japanese TV commercials and known as the swaying kiwifruit during last year’s trade mission to Japan.

Fortunately, Ardern had a spare after losing an eye following an incident with an employee.

Andrew Cornaga / www.photosport.

Ruby Tui celebrating her try during the New Zealand v France semi-final match at Eden Park.

During dinner with a number of Black Ferns athletes, including Stacey Fluhler, Portia Woodman and Ayesha Leti-I’iga in Auckland, Ardern received a cheeky question from rugby star Ruby Tui.

Tui posted on social media asking Ardern, “Aunt Cindy, I’m just wondering when you’re done being prime minister, can you give me Ardern [a turn]?”

As of 2022 there are 15 Commonwealth realms: Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Belize, Canada, Grenada, Jamaica, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, and Great Britain.

Does NZ pay the royal family?

In fact, the monarchy involves only a small expenditure for royal engagements and tours in this country, and the modest expenses of the establishment of the Governor-General. Read also : The story of Dallas Cowboys cheerleader Erin Andrews is going viral. This figure is about one dollar per person per year.

How much does NZ pay the royal family? Most of that is spent on security, he says, but the family also receives about NZ$170 million a year in sovereign wealth funds from the government.

How much does NZ pay to be in the Community? In 2022 New Zealand contributed almost $3 million to the Commonwealth Secretariat and just over $2 million to other Commonwealth organisations. This included voluntary contributions to: The Commonwealth Fund for Technical Cooperation (CTFC) – this fund supports technical assistance to developing countries.

Does New Zealand pay money to the crown? He does this, not for personal glory or accolades, but out of great personal respect and admiration for New Zealand. The New Zealand taxpayer contributes nothing to the personal expenses of the King, or any member of the Royal Family, nor to the costs of the royal household and residences in Great Britain.

Does New Zealand have The Queen on their money?

The image of the queen can be found on the currency of more than 15 countries, the most populated are Great Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Read also : Eva Mendes shares her many roles as a mother: ‘Chauffeur, personal chef, stylist, therapist, cheerleader and assistant’.

What NZ coin has the Queen on it? The portrait of the queen used on the $20 bill was retained as the shadow image on all bills in this series.

Read also :
CAIRO – The Cairo High School cheerleading team received an at-large bid…

When did New Zealand split from the UK?

In this sense, 1947 can be said to mark the date of New Zealand’s legal independence. This may interest you : Sirianni explains why Steichen will continue to call plays for the Eagles in 2022.

Was New Zealand once part of Great Britain? 16 November 1840 New Zealand officially became a separate colony within the British Empire, severing its connection to New South Wales. North, South and Stewart Islands were to be known respectively as the provinces of New Ulster, New Munster and New Leinster.

When did New Zealand separate from Great Britain? In 1948 New Zealanders became New Zealand citizens – previously they were British citizens. New Zealand gained full legal independence when Parliament passed the Constitution Act 1986.

Bland County Football Cancellation Affects Boosters, Cheerleaders
This may interest you :
The premature end of the Bland County High School football program also…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RSS
LinkedIn
Share
WhatsApp